Figure 7‐5 This is a close‐up view of Figure 7‐4. The arrow points to the end of the crack. The crack is propagating toward the bottom flange of the girder. Cracks in the bottom flange of a girder can cause a catastrophic girder failure.

calculation Stress girder Overhead Crane

To calculate the stress in an overhead crane girder, you will need to consider the following factors:

1. Dead Load: This is the weight of the girder itself, including any attachments and accessories. The dead load is a constant and can be easily calculated based on the material weight and dimensions of the girder.

2. Live Load: This is the weight of the crane and the load it carries. The live load varies depending on the application and can be calculated based on the weight of the heaviest load the crane will lift, as well as the rigging and any other attachments used.

3. Dynamic Load: This is the additional load caused by the motion of the crane and its load, such as acceleration, deceleration, and sudden stops. The dynamic load can be calculated based on the type of crane and the speed and frequency of its movements.

4. Impact Load: This is the additional load caused by the impact of the crane and its load when they come to a sudden stop or collide with another object.

calculation joint plate girder Overhead Crane
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